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Alex Nguyen has served as a trumpeter, composer, arranger, music director in a diverse range of musical contexts.

The Savannah, Georgia native has performed extensively on trumpet as a bandleader and sideman with some of the world’s finest up-and-coming and veteran jazz musicians.  Nguyen has appeared at notable New York City venues such as Birdland, Kitano, Iridium, Mezzrow, Lincoln Center, the Metropolitan Museum, and has had the opportunity to perform throughout Europe, Asia and the United States.  He is the winner of the International Trumpet Guild Jazz Competition, and Jamey Aebersold Award for Artistry at the National Trumpet Competition.

Nguyen’s contributions as a composer and arranger span from choral music to big band.  His composition “The First Year” was featured on NEA Jazz Master Kenny Barron’s album The Traveler.  He was selected as a composer/performer for residencies at Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., and Ravinia's Steans Music Institute in Chicago.  In the realm of sacred music, Nguyen has composed and arranged numerous works for choir and other ensembles, and blended traditional hymns, spirituals, jazz and gospel at St George’s Church, where he previously worked as music director.  Seeking to cultivate community around music, Nguyen has programmed a variety of musical events from communal singing, to jazz clubs and concert series, providing musicians opportunities to premiere new projects to appreciative audiences.

A graduate of the University of North Florida’s Jazz Studies program where he studied with legendary alto saxophonist Bunky Green, Nguyen also holds a Masters in Jazz Studies from SUNY Purchase, where he studied with seminal trumpeters Jon Faddis and Jim Rotondi.


 
Alex Nguyen’s solo is achingly beautiful.
He conjures up the essence of Miles Davis’s message with space, depth, and sensitivity.
— Bunky Green
Soloists who caught my ear included… Alex Nguyen whose muted trumpet
was featured all the way on a deliciously slow-cooked version of “Mean to Me.
— Jack Bowers, All About Jazz
Nguyen exhibits amazing control of the trumpet, harnessing the horn’s power with an astounding expressiveness that seems as if each breath carries with it a specific emotional message.
— The South Magazine
The First Year,” a gentle bossa nova by Alex Nguyen, a student whom Barron recently met at a Washington, D.C., performance, was another high point. The piece was simply written but meaty.
— The Star-Ledger